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    PARTY OF ONE: Ways to Beat Valentine’s Day Stress

    February 12, 2016

February 12, 2016

PARTY OF ONE: Ways to Beat Valentine’s Day Stress

Here’s the second step in getting your focus off of the stressful demands that we overspend, overeat, and overemphasize sensuality on a particular calendar date. Let’s start a new conversation about how to have a party of one…YOU! We are all in relationship with ourselves, and we spend more time with ourselves than with anyone else on earth. If you want to respect yourself, and feel great while doing it, you need to be good to yourself. No one else can do these things for you.

Step 1 was Take Care of Your Body!  Today’s step . . .

Step 2. Take Care of Your Mind!

  • “As a man thinks in his heart, so is he.” The quality of our lives is directly determined by our thoughts. If we are positive, grateful, and joyful, our bodies will feel less stressed. If we are negative, complaining, and bitter, our bodies will ache, and we will be prone to disease.
  • Because our bodies are electrical in nature, our feelings travel to the brain through electrical impulses in our nerves. Those feelings are then magnetically radiated from our bodies. We can almost always tell when someone is sad, angry, or fearful. If we take care of our minds, then we will radiate love, joy, peace, and health to the world around us!

  • Ancient Chinese medicine associated emotional conflicts to specific organ functions. For instance:
    • The kidneys could be affected by fear or shock.
    • The spleen or pancreas could be affected by worry or fretting.
    • The liver could be affected by anger or frustration.
    • The lungs could be affected by sadness or suppressed grief.
    • The heart could be affected by excessive excitement.
  • The problem with living in our modern world is that our environment, our food supply, and the rapid pace of our culture all combine to cause fear, shock, frustration, sadness, grief, and excessive excitement to our nerves. No wonder our bodies are stressed! Our minds don’t know the difference between excitotoxins in our foods, or true trauma. Nor do they know the difference between perceived threats (like horror movies or bloody crime dramas on television) and real threats of endangerment to our lives.
  • We can protect our minds by watching what we eat, what we watch, what we listen to, and what we allow ourselves to think about. All these avenues affect our minds; and in turn our stress levels and our overall health.

 

Tomorrow . . . Step 3